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Pearson Electronics PE-301X Current Monitor

Manufacturer part number: 301X
50 kA, 200nS rise time
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$1,300.00Configurations
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Available Configurations

CURRENT PROBE, 50 KA, 200NS RISE TIME.
30010976
$1300

Whether you are interested in observing and measuring submilliamp currents in a charged particle beam or thousands of amps resulting from a fault in a major power feeder, you will find a Pearson current monitor to suit your needs. The use of their patented distributed termination technique permits pulse-current monitoring of rise times as short as two nanoseconds. Their current sensor devices of larger inner diameter make possible high voltage current measurement without the risk of voltage breakdown. Several of their current transformer models feature double shielding for greater noise immunity and increased safety in high voltage applications. All models are sealed and are suitable for use in high voltage insulating oil or under vacuum. They can be connected to oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers, power analyzers, digital voltmeters, analog-to-digital convertors, and a variety of other measuring instruments.

  • Sensitivity: 0.01 Volt/Ampere +1/-0%
  • Output resistance: 50 Ohms
  • Maximum peak current: 50,000 Amperes
  • Maximum rms current: 400 Amperes
  • Droop rate: 3.0 %/millisecond
  • Useable rise time: 200 nanoseconds
  • Current time product: 22 Ampere-second
  • Low frequency 3dB cut-off: 5 Hz (approximate)
  • High frequency 3dB cut-off: 2 MHz (approximate)
  • I/f figure: 140 peak Amperes/Hz
  • Shielding: Double
  • Output connector: UHF (SO-239)
  • Operating temperature: 0 to 65 o C
  • Weight: 17.5 pounds
Description

Whether you are interested in observing and measuring submilliamp currents in a charged particle beam or thousands of amps resulting from a fault in a major power feeder, you will find a Pearson current monitor to suit your needs. The use of their patented distributed termination technique permits pulse-current monitoring of rise times as short as two nanoseconds. Their current sensor devices of larger inner diameter make possible high voltage current measurement without the risk of voltage breakdown. Several of their current transformer models feature double shielding for greater noise immunity and increased safety in high voltage applications. All models are sealed and are suitable for use in high voltage insulating oil or under vacuum. They can be connected to oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers, power analyzers, digital voltmeters, analog-to-digital convertors, and a variety of other measuring instruments.